Landslide Support for Commonwealth Integrity Commission with Public Hearings and Whistle-blower Complaint Capability

The Australia Institute commissioned uComms to conduct a survey of residents across the federal electorates of Brisbane (622 residents), Braddon (632 residents), Boothby (641 residents) and Bennelong (629 residents) on the nights of 4th and 5th of August 2021.

Key Findings:

  • Seat of Brisbane – 78.2% of Brisbane voters support setting up a Commonwealth Integrity Commission, with 61% strongly supporting the measure. Only 14.9% oppose.
    • 72% of Brisbane voters think the Commonwealth Integrity Commission should have the power to hold public hearings, with just 14.5% thinking it should not have such powers.
    • 81.5% of Brisbane voters think that such a body should have the power to receive and act on whistle-blower complaints, with just 12.7% thinking it should not have such powers.
  • Seat of Braddon – 87.4% of Braddon voters support setting up a Commonwealth Integrity Commission, with 62% strongly supporting the measure. Only 7.1% oppose.
    • 81.8% of Braddon voters think the Commonwealth Integrity Commission should have the power to hold public hearings, with just 5.2% thinking it should not have such powers.
    • 75.5% of Braddon voters think that such a body should have the power to receive and act on whistle-blower complaints, with just 10.4% thinking it should not have such powers.
  • Seat of Bennelong – 90.1% of Bennelong voters support setting up a Commonwealth Integrity Commission, with 66.3% strongly supporting the measure. Only 4.3% oppose.
    • 77.4% of Bennelong voters think the Commonwealth Integrity Commission should have the power to hold public hearings, with just 8.4% thinking it should not have such powers.
    • 83.5% of Bennelong voters think that such a body should have the power to receive and act on whistle-blower complaints, with just 6% thinking it should not have such powers.
  • Seat of Boothby – 87.8% of Boothby voters support setting up a Commonwealth Integrity Commission, with 64.4% strongly supporting the measure. Only 5.9% oppose.
    • 74.7% of Boothby voters think the Commonwealth Integrity Commission should have the power to hold public hearings, with just 9.6% thinking it should not have such powers.
    • 83% of Boothby voters think that such a body should have the power to receive and act on whistle-blower complaints, with just 5.8% thinking it should not have such powers.

“This research demonstrates that Australians across the country overwhelmingly want a national anti-corruption watchdog, and specifically one that can hold public hearings and act on whistle-blower complaints,” said Bill Browne, senior researcher in the Australia Institute’s Democracy & Accountability Program.

“Australians have waited long enough. Trust in government and politics will remain poor until serious integrity concerns can be investigated at the federal level,” Mr Browne said.

“This polling makes it abundantly clear that the weak federal integrity commission model proposed by the Government in no way meets the standards expected by the Australian people. Nothing but a robust federal integrity commission, that can hold public hearings and accept referrals from any member of the public, will be acceptable to the Australian public,” said Helen Haines, Independent Member for Indi.

“The will among Australians for a robust integrity commission with actual powers is undeniable. We have had enough of the Government’s delays and broken promises. My Australian Federal Integrity Commission Bill is ready, and could be established before the next election is held. I will be working with my colleagues across the political spectrum in coming days and weeks to find a path for my Bill. Australians have waited long enough, and we can’t allow more scandals and rorts to pass by without a proper watchdog on the case,” Dr Haines said.

Media Enquiries

Anna Chang Communications Director

0422 775 161

anna@australiainstitute.org.au