April 2023

March 2023

Australian Inflation Reflects a Historic Redistribution from Workers to Bosses

by Jim Stanford in The Conversation

The upsurge of inflation since the COVID-19 lockdowns has not had equal impacts on all Australians. Workers and low-income people have experienced the worst losses: both because their incomes, in most cases, have not kept up with prices, and because they are more dependent on essential goods and services (like shelter, food, and energy) than higher-income households.

Science before politics crucial in climate change fight

by Ebony Bennett in Canberra Times

Just as the recent economic policy debate about tax breaks for multimillionaire superannuants has been overshadowed by sensationalist tabloid journalism (instead of what constitutes a dignified retirement), now the debate about climate policy risks being dominated by history wars and partisan politics – instead of what the science has been telling us for decades.

February 2023

Labor’s safeguard mechanism does more to save the fossil fuel industry than it does the planet

by Richard Denniss in The Guardian

The enormous PEP-11 gas project off Sydney’s northern beaches is back in the headlines and the timing couldn’t be worse for a federal Labor government trying to rush a new climate policy through the parliament; a policy that does nothing to stop new gas and coalmines being built and doesn’t even stop major polluters increasing their emissions. Labor’s Madeline King must now remake the decision made by our undercover resources minister, Scott Morrison.

January 2023

Nothing to see here

by Richard Denniss in The Monthly

If a pandemic killed 15,000 people and nobody seemed to notice, was it really a pandemic? In Australia last year, COVID-19 killed more people than lung cancer, breast cancer, prostate cancer, car accidents and drowning combined. And in addition to the 15,000 deaths directly attributed to COVID, the Australian Bureau of Statistics tells us that

High time Jim Chalmers aimed reform agenda at institutions like Productivity Commission

by Richard Denniss in Canberra Times

Whether Treasurer Jim Chalmers reforms, restructures, or simply removes the Productivity Commission is, like the commission itself, largely irrelevant. The advisory body that once sat at the vanguard of Australia’s failed experiment with neoliberalism now sits impotently on the sidelines of Australian policy debate. Bizarrely, in rejecting calls for the abolition of the PC this week some

The RBA’s policy guide is wrong

by Richard Denniss in The Saturday Paper

The unemployment rate published by the Australian Bureau of Statistics is an incredibly stable, accurate and reliable indicator of something almost entirely irrelevant. It provides us with 63 years’ worth of raw data on the number of Australians who worked for less than one hour, were actively seeking work and, because they had no caring responsibilities, were available to start work immediately.

December 2022

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